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Tag Archives: meaning

Translation: not as easy as it looks

Translation is the process of translating words or text from one language into another. It’s a written or spoken rendering of the meaning of a word, speech, book, or other text, in another language. It sounds pretty simple, right?

But translation is much more than that. It’s not only translating words, but communicating the meaning of a word using an equivalent in another language. Some words are easy, right? Colors, for example. Black will always be black, green will always be green, and blue will always be blue. Right? Not really.

How about feeling blue? The person is not blue per se, but we do associate the color blue with the way the person is feeling. And how about the expression green with envy? You probably can even imagine someone’s face getting green in this case, but is this the same in other languages? How about if you heard someone saying purple with envy? Would that sound right to you? Well, it is the equivalent to green with envy in Portuguese.

Translating a text (any type of text) requires a great deal of knowledge and adaptation. The translator has to adapt the sentence and use the meaning of the words or expressions, not their literal translation. Context is another thing to pay attention to. Have you ever tried to use free online translators? They do help, but unless you have at least some knowledge of both languages, you have to be careful, or you could end up offending someone by accident.

When in doubt, ask for help.

 

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To condone, or not to condone: that is the question.

To condone means to overlook and accept as harmless a behavior considered immoral or wrong. It means to make allowances for a bad behavior without criticism.

When someone behaves in a certain way, a way you do not approve of or you feel it’s not appropriate, and you do nothing about it, you’re allowing it to happen. You’re looking the other way and pretending you didn’t see it. Therefore, when you’re lenient with objectionable behavior, you condone it. When you condone bad behavior, you allow it to take place.

If you condone dishonesty in the company you keep, what’s to stop you from becoming untruthful yourself? After all, we are known by the company we keep. And nowadays, with technology and all, we’re also known by the ones we choose to follow or befriend online. If you choose to follow a certain twitter account or a certain blog, and you allow that person to behave a certain way and say the things that person wants without doing anything about it, what does that say about you?

Be careful what kind of behavior you condone. Because that shows your character. And character is everything.

Be careful what you think…
Your thoughts become your words, Your words become your actions
Your actions become your habits, Your habits become your character
Your character is everything

 

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Biting the hand that feeds you is never a good idea.

I love sayings, proverbs, and things like that. I like knowing what they mean and where they come fromThey are full of meaning and seem to survive the centuries. Like biting the hand that feeds you, for example. was first used, at least that’s what the records show, by the Greek poet Sappho around 600 BC, and it was first recorded in English in 1711.

The metaphor of a dog biting its mater’s hand is used to talk about a person repaying support with wrong. It means to turn against a benefactor, a supporter, or a friend. People forget that the hand that feeds them, or has fed them in the past, may still one day be needed. But that’s not even the biggest problem here. I think the worst thing is to see the lack of respect this person shows for someone who was once there for him/her.

It is sad to see such thing happening. But if this has been happening since Sappho was alive, what does that say about us, humans? Collins is right. “We’re fickle, stupid beings with poor memories and a great gift for self-destruction.

 

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O Sarcasm Font, Where Art Thou?

Watch your words. Once you give them life, they can only be forgiven, never forgotten.

I think it’s so funny how people often forget the power words have. A simple word can damage someone’s self-esteem. It can harm someone more than any punch you can throw. The right word, can make or break us.

“The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right time, but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.” Dorothy Nevill

Words are sticks and stones.

But not only words have power, they can also be delivered in a variety of ways, and the inflection used can be the difference between good and evil. You can say the same sentence in different ways and obtain different results every time. You can be funny, sarcastic, evil, honest. It’s all in the way you deliver what you’re thinking.

Now, how about the written word? As of now, at least to extent of my knowledge, there’s no such thing as a font for sarcasm. I’m pretty sure someone will create one sooner or later. And that someone will get rich. But for now, there’s no such thing. Therefore, the written word demands a certain special attention the spoken word doesn’t. And that’s because it comes with no facial expression or the inflection on your voice to aid the recipient in identifying its true meaning.

People think, “Of course they know what I mean. They know me. Of course that’s dripping with sarcasm.” But is it that obvious? I’ve seen so many arguments start with a misinterpreted text or email, I can’t even count. People think they are so clever, but they are just being hurtful. Then they use the excuse that they are only responsible for what they say, not for what others understand. I can see that, to a certain extent, but I think the more correct thought process would be to say I’m responsible for what I say and the way in which I say it. And I’m responsible for giving it the meaning it should carry.

“We may have the right to free speech, but speech is not entirely free. There are always consequences for what we say, whether or not we realize our impact.” Amy Jane

Recently I received an email that hurt me. It contained hurtful words and it was quite disturbing, since it came from someone really close to me. So I replied to it. And this person told me, “Oh, that was not my intention.” Well, to this person, the only thing I have to say is, it doesn’t matter what you intended, but the end result of what you said. It’s easy to say things and then just say, “Sorry, I didn’t mean to.” No, you didn’t mean to. But that was what you accomplished. And apologizing for your words won’t make them go away.

To all those people, I’m sorry that I heard what you said, not what you meant. Next time be more clear about what your real intentions are.

P.S.: I surely believe the world needs a sarcasm font. As soon as possible.

 

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