RSS

Category Archives: Oh The Things We Say

Dealing with negative comments

This is a video created by Vi Hart, and I know that I’ve been posting a lot of videos lately, but I’ve been struggling with writing and trying to make my stories the way I want them to be and the videos help me.

Anyway, this one is about negative comments, and although she’s talking about comments on YouTube, this can be applied to comments on blogs and even on our own work.

So always remember: you have no power over them that they don’t give you, and most importantly, they have no power over you that you don’t give them. You don’t make things for their approval. You make them because it’s in you to create. So create something. And then share it. Because you are capable of more than you realize.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Have you heard of Sartalics?

Not too long ago I was complaining about the difficulties of conveying sarcasm in writing. Now I find out three interns are attempting to solve this problem with Sartalics! Sartalics is a reverse italics font, which is just like italics but leaning left instead of right.

To make their campaign known, the interns are gathering a Twitter mob of 10,000 people to simultaneously tweet at tech giants Yahoo, Google, Twitter, Facebook, Microsoft, Tumblr, YouTube and Apple. The tweet “@(company name and person in charge of decisions at said company) needs a sarcasm font style option way more than another layout update! #nosarcasm.” will be sent automatically when the campaign hits 10,000 participants. Last I saw, the Sartalics twitter account had 2,304 followers already.

Let’s all join the twitterblitz for Sartalics!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Amas Veritas

Young Sally: “He will hear my call a mile away. He will whistle my favorite song. He can ride a pony backwards.”

Young Gillian: What are you doing?

Young Sally: Summoning up a true love spell called Amas Veritas. “He can flip pancakes in the air. He’ll be marvelously kind. And his favorite shape will be a star. And he’ll have one green eye and one blue.”

Young Gillian: Thought you never wanted to fall in love.

Young Sally: That’s the point. The guy I dreamed up doesn’t exist. And if he doesn’t exist, I’ll never die of a broken heart.

How many times in our lives do we kid ourselves and avoid going down a certain path thinking we can protect ourselves from getting hurt? And more important, can we? Can we really avoid breaking our hearts? Or are we just breaking them ourselves in the odd chance that someone else would do it?

Life is short. Live it. Jump in head first. Do what scares you the most. No excuses. No regrets.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Look! A giant guinea pig!

A day at the zoo with a 4-year-old:

Boy – Look! A giant guinea pig!

Me – Where? (Trying to see what was behind the capybara only to realize that that was the giant guinea pig he was referring to.)

The 120 lb animal now to be known as giant guinea pig.

I guess he’s right, capybaras do look like giant guinea pigs.

I’m not a 2 lb capybara, I swear.

And they are related, so…

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Dog-tired after a long day

Today was… Well… You know when you suddenly realize you need to pee so bad you don’t think you’ll make it to the bathroom, then you wonder how could you not know you had to pee, and then you realize it was because you barely had time to consider the possibility? Yep, that was today. At some point during the day I sat down and had a few gulps of diet coke and realized my throat even hurt from drinking it. Yep, I was that thirsty that I had to drink it so fast it even hurt.

Anyhow… It was a great day, nonetheless. Right now I’m so tired I’m not even that hungry. I am, and I know it. Last time I ate was over seven hours ago, so of course I’m hungry by now. But I’m just so tired… I’m thinking of the possibilities and trying to decide which one will require less energy to prepare. That’s indeed very sad. Or funny. One or the other, I’m not sure, I’m too tired to decide anything right now.

Dog-tired. Yep, that seems about right.

Bob Hope once said “You never get tired unless you stop and take time for it.” Maybe that was my mistake, to sit down and allow myself feel tired. But gosh darn it, I am going to take time today to just feel tired. And you know what? I think sometimes it feels pretty good to feel tired after a long day of work.

[Image credit: Greg Westfall]

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Grown-ups & figures. Go figure.

The Little Prince

Photo courtesy of ;Deirdreamer

“Grown-ups love figures. When you tell them that you have made a new friend, they never ask you any questions about essential matters. They never say to you, ‘What does his voice sound like? What games does he love best? Does he collect butterflies?’ Instead, they demand: ‘How old is he? How many brothers has he? How much does he weigh? How much money does his father make?’ Only from these figures do they think they have learned anything about him.”

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Our odd relationship with words

“We have an odd relationship with words. We learn a few when we are small, throughout our lives we collect others through education, conversation, our contact with books, and yet, in comparison, there are only a tiny number about whose meaning, sense, and denotation we would have absolutely no doubts, if one day, we were to ask ourselves seriously what they meant. Thus we affirm and deny, thus we convince and are convinced, thus we argue, deduce, and conclude, wandering fearlessly over the surface of concepts about which we only have the vaguest of ideas, and, despite the false air of confidence that we generally effect as we feel our way along the road in verbal darkness, we manage, more or less, to understand each other and even, sometimes, to find each other.”

José Saramago (The Double)

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The things we say

“We say to the confused, Know thyself, as if knowing yourself was not the fifth and most difficult of human arithmetical operations, we say to the apathetic, Where there’s a will, there’s a way, as if the brute realities of the world did not amuse themselves each day by turning that phrase on its head, we say to the indecisive, Begin at the beginning, as if beginning were the clearly visible point of a loosely wound thread and all we had to do was to keep pulling until we reached the other end, and as if, between the former and the latter, we had held in our hands a smooth, continuous thread with no knots to untie, no snarls to untangle, a complete impossibility in the life of a skein, or indeed, if we may be permitted one more stock phrase, in the skein of life.”

José Saramago (The Cave)

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Forgetting: not just for old people anymore.

A few years ago I accompanied my grandma to one of her lunches with her friends. My grandma was 76 at the time and all the other ladies were either 85 or 86. They said my grandma was the baby of the group, since she was so young. The lunch was very long, with each of them taking their time to chew their food and still manage to tell stories, but it was a great time. Mainly because of the stories, I didn’t care much about the chewing.

One of them started complaining because her son wanted to hire a maid to help her out during the day. How dare he. She was incredibly upset about that. She said she told her son that was not an option, because if she didn’t have the work around the house to do, she wouldn’t have enough things to occupy her throughout the day. Then another one started talking about how she had a maid and she’d send the girl to wipe the leaves of her plants. She’d send the girl to the porch (apparently she had a lot of foliage there) and give the girl a tiny cloth to go wipe the plants. This way the girl wouldn’t bother her and she could cook as she pleased.

That lead to the cooking topic. They all shared how much they loved to cook. Then one of them started saying she liked to knit while she waited for the food to be ready, but it was hard but she’d go sit down to knit and forget about the food. So one of them said “You should do what I do. Put a chair in front of the stove. This way you won’t forget about it.”

I just remembered all of that because I was sitting on my couch and though “Something smells good,” and after a second I thought “My food!” and ran to the kitchen to rescue my lunch.

Maybe it’s time for me to start putting a chair in front of the stove.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

To condone, or not to condone: that is the question.

To condone means to overlook and accept as harmless a behavior considered immoral or wrong. It means to make allowances for a bad behavior without criticism.

When someone behaves in a certain way, a way you do not approve of or you feel it’s not appropriate, and you do nothing about it, you’re allowing it to happen. You’re looking the other way and pretending you didn’t see it. Therefore, when you’re lenient with objectionable behavior, you condone it. When you condone bad behavior, you allow it to take place.

If you condone dishonesty in the company you keep, what’s to stop you from becoming untruthful yourself? After all, we are known by the company we keep. And nowadays, with technology and all, we’re also known by the ones we choose to follow or befriend online. If you choose to follow a certain twitter account or a certain blog, and you allow that person to behave a certain way and say the things that person wants without doing anything about it, what does that say about you?

Be careful what kind of behavior you condone. Because that shows your character. And character is everything.

Be careful what you think…
Your thoughts become your words, Your words become your actions
Your actions become your habits, Your habits become your character
Your character is everything

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: